Immanuel Wallerstein and the Problem of the World.

by Davis, Emily S. [2012-04-01]

Review

pages 4

The article reviews the book "Immanuel Wallerstein and the Problem of the World" edited by David Palumbo-Liu, Bruce Robbins and Nirvana Tanoukhi.


Academic Journal

pages 7

An essay is presented on the discussion of Professor Immanuel Wallerstein on the renewal of humanities base from the two cultures problems. The author explores Wallerstein's notion for renewed humanities and agrees that renewed humanities should integrate all existing social science disciplines including the knowledge in modern natural science. He also says that the two cultures problem contributes to the start of capitalism, which provides division between science and humanities.


A Tribute to Dr. Judith Wallerstein (1921-2012).

by Johnston, Jan [2012-10-01]

Academic Journal

pages 2

The article presents an obituary for researcher and writer Judith Wallerstein is presented.


After Developmentalism and Globalization, What?

by Wallerstein, Immanuel [2005-03-01]

Academic Journal

pages 16

This article presents the text of a speech given by Immanuel Wallerstein of Yale University at the conference Development Challenges for the 21st Century at Cornell University on October 1, 2004. Development was a set of concrete actions effectuated by Europeans to exploit and draw profit from the resources of the non-European world. There were a number of assumptions in this view: Non-Europeans would not be able or perhaps even willing to develop their resources without the active intrusion of the pan-European world. But such development represented a material and moral good for the world. It was therefore the moral and political duty of the pan-Europeans to exploit the resources of these countries. There was consequently nothing wrong with the fact that, as a reward, the pan-Europeans who exploited the resources drew profit from them, since a secondary advantage would go to the persons whose resources were being exploited in this way. The intellectual analyses and the derived policy efforts represented by the discussion about development and globalization were serious and respectable, if in retrospect quite misguided in many ways. The first question we need to ask now is, is it at all possible for every part of the world to attain? The second question is, if it is not, is it possible for the present lopsided and highly inegalitarian world-system to persist, more or less as such? And the third question is, if it is not, what kinds of alternatives present themselves to all of us now?


Review

pages 4

A review of the book "Immanuel Wallerstein and the Problem of the World: System, Scale, Culture," edited by David Palumbo-Liu, Bruce Robbins, and Nirvana Tanoukhi, is presented.


Review

pages 4

The article reviews the book "Selected Works of Michael Wallerstein: The Political Economy of Inequality, Unions and Social Democracy," edited by David Austen Smith, Jeffry A. Frieden, Miriam A. Golden, Karl Ove Moene and Adam Przeworski.


Generation Ex-.

by Cherlin, Andrew J. [2000-12-11]

Periodical

pages 4

The article critically analyses the book "The Unexpected Legacy of Divorce: A 25-Year Landmark Study," by Judith S. Wallerstein, Julia Lewis and Sandra Blakeslee. The American divorce rate doubled in the 1960s and 1970s. At current rates, about half of all marriages will end in divorce. In 1971, Wallerstein selected sixty families that had been referred by their attorneys and others to her marriage and divorce clinic in Marin County, California, shortly after the parents separated. Wallerstein kept in touch with the 131 children from these families.


Academic Journal

pages 11

Interviews social scientist Immanuel Wallerstein concerning the role of culture in globalization or the transition of the world-system. Application of culture in world-system analysis; Interrelation among culture, economics and politics; Possibility of a cultural globalization.


Wallerstein's Neglect of Nelson's "Rationales".

by Jones, Thomas E. [1979-09-01]

Academic Journal

pages 4

This article focuses on the relevance of decisive changes in "rationales," symbolic guidance systems intended to regulate people's responses, and of accompanying changes in structures of consciousness to revolutionary socio-cultural changes. This dimension was emphasized by historical sociologist Benjamin Nelson but minimized by sociologist Immanuel Wallerstein. The author argues that Wallerstein underestimates the role that rationales sometimes play in promoting such changes. Accordingly, it appears that his theoretical framework and substantive analyses could be enhanced by incorporating certain features of Nelson's approach. Wallerstein treats the modern world-system, which transcends political boundaries, as a world economy, for the basic linkage between the parts of the system, he thinks, is economic. He provides a more systematic analysis of the dynamics of this system than does Nelson. Nelson's study of the great civilizational complexes associated with world religions has uncovered a series of patterns in the structures of consciousness and the degrees of collectivity or individuation in the forms of representation.


WALLERSTEIN AND HIS CRITICS.

by Garst, Daniel [1985-07-01]

Academic Journal

pages 27

This article comments on Theda Skocpol and Robert Brenner's reviews of the book, The Modern World System, by Immanuel Wallerstein. In Volume II of the book, Wallerstein meets the criticisms advanced by Brenner and Skocpol of Volume I's treatment of state formation and structures, and in doing so, he has constructed an account of the relationship between state structures, the economic and political interaction between the economic classes residing in their jurisdiction, and the role that their owner-producers play in the Capitalist World Economy's division of labor that is richer and more subtle than that contained in Volume I. Wallerstein's responses in the second installment of the Modern World System to Skocpol's and Brenner's critiques of the first are significant because their criticisms are more compelling than the arguments customarily advanced by Wallerstein's realist critics in international politics. While the typical realist critiques of Wallerstein's work are based upon a fundamental misreading of Modern World System theory, the review essays of Skocpol and Brenner point to a number of serious problems in Volume I's treatment of state formation and structures. As Skocpol and Brenner note, this thinking neither explains why the two countries with the strongest economies during the period, England and Holland, failed to develop strong absolutist monarchies, while France and Spain, which were economically weaker, did, nor the development of strong absolutist monarchies like Sweden and Prussia in the periphery and semiperiphery.


Academic Journal

pages 4

Comments on Peter J. Taylor's article on the poverty of international comparison in modern social science, published in the March 1987 issue of 'Studies in Comparative International Development.' Dominance of Taylor's personal opinion in his empirical analysis over the standard sketches he is criticizing; Complexity of his discussion on democracy; Contradictions in Taylor's approach towards history of ideas and movements.


Academic Journal

pages 9

An interview with American sociologist Immanuel Maurice Wallerstein is presented. When asked if he and British historian Perry Anderson felt something similar when they both published major works about the origins of the modern world in 1974, Wallerstein says that they did in the sense that they wrote about the same subject. He explains that his Perry's vision is focused on classical Marxism with historical concepts when told by the interviewer his is somewhat different.


Academic Journal

pages 20

World system theory, founded and developed by Immanuel Wallerstein, continues Marx's original vision of modern economy as a zero-sum game based on exploitation. Ignoring convincing criticism of Marx's economics, Wallerstein broadens spatial confines of the applicability of Marxist economics to include the whole world. Imaginatively combining Marxist and postmodernist frames of reference, Wallerstein constructs a future economic and social system reminiscent of a classical Marxist utopia. This endeavor, which Wallerstein calls “utopistics,” provides a logical conclusion to world system theory, as it finalizes a practice of defending Marxian analysis of the past and the present in terms of an imagined future. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 12

World-systems analysis, although itself a macrohistorical perspective, eminently allows for writing individual biographies because these are structurally conditioned and historically contingent trajectories developing in specific time and space. The biographical genre seems particularly useful in intellectual popularization and in exploring how macro-level concepts behave in observed empirical situations. This article offers and demonstrates specific recommendations and methodological warnings in application to the personal trajectory of Immanuel Wallerstein, the founder of world-systems analysis as an intellectual movement. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


DEVRİMSEL SÜREÇ OLARAK ARAP BAHARI'NI IMMANUEL WALLERSTEIN ÜZERİNDEN ANLAMAK.

by ŞAHİN MENCÜTEK, Zeynep, POLAT, Ferihan, DURMUŞ, Ayşegül [2015-11-01]

Academic Journal

pages 15

No subject.

IMMANUEL WALLERSTEIN'S WORLD SYSTEM THEORY.

by Sorinel, Cosma [2010-12-01]

Academic Journal

pages 5

World-systems analysis is not a theory, but an approach to social analysis and social change developed, among others by the Immanuel Wallerstein. Professor Wallerstein writes in three domains of world-systems analysis: the historical development of the modern world-system; the contemporary crisis of the capitalist world-economy; the structures of knowledge. The American anlyst rejects the notion of a "Third World", claiming there is only one world connected by a complex network of economic exchange relationship. Our world system is characterized by mechanisms which bring about a redistribution of resources from the periphery to the core. His analytical approach has made a significant impact and established an institutional base devoted to the general approach [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Robert S. Wallerstein (1921–2014).

by Seligman, Stephen [2015-09-01]

Academic Journal

pages 3

This brief note introduces a memoir by Robert S. Wallerstein, M.D. Wallerstein’s essay reviews his career, beginning as an internist and soon as a psychiatrist–psychoanalyst. Wallerstein’s professional account of his development tracks the historical periods within which it unfolded. This reflects his own social and political awareness, which was expressed in the activist spirit that vitalized his work within established medical and psychoanalytic institutions. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]