Plant Biochemistry.

by Cadogan, Alan [2009-05-01]

Review

pages unknown

The article reviews the book "Plant Biochemistry," by Caroline Bowsher, Martin Steer and Alyson Tobin Taylor.


British Biochemistry--Past and Present (Book).

by Watkins, John [1971-07-01]

Review

pages unknown

Reviews the book "British Biochemistry: Past and Present," edited by T. W. Goodwin.


Review

pages 1

Reviews the book "Introduction to Ecological Biochemistry," by J.B. Harborne.


Review

pages unknown

Reviews the book 'The Biochemistry of Schizophrenia and Addiction,' edited by Gwynneth Hemmings.


Review

pages unknown

Reviews the book 'A Documentary History of Biochemistry 1770—1940,' edited by M. Teich with D.M. Needham.


Essays in biochemistry (Book).

by Reynolds, Tony [2001-12-01]

Review

pages unknown

Reviews the book "Essays in Biochemistry," vol. 36, edited by P. Bernstein.


Review

pages 1

Reviews the book "Lipid Biochemistry: An Introduction," edited by Michael I. Gurr, John L. Harwood and Keith N. Frayn.


Review

pages 1

Reviews the book "Annual Review of Biochemistry," vol. 72, edited by Charles C. Richardson, Roger D. Kornberg, Christian R. H. Raetz, and Jeremy W. Thorner.


Clinical Biochemistry.

by Rogić, Dunja [2007-11-01]

Review

pages 2

The article reviews the book "Clinical Biochemistry," 3rd edition, by Allan Gaw, Michael J. Murphy, Robert A. Cowan, Denis St. J. O’Reilly, Michael J.Stewart and James Shepherd.


Review

pages 1

The article reviews the book "Exercise Biochemistry," by V. Mougios.


Comprehensive Biochemistry (Book).

by Consden, R. [1969-03-01]

Review

pages 2

Reviews the book "Comprehensive Biochemistry," by M. Florkin and E.H. Stotz.


Chromatin and Disease: Subcellular Biochemistry.

by Mishra, Rakesh K., Roy, Siddhartha [2009-07-25]

Review

pages 2

The article reviews the book "Chromatin and Disease: Subcellular Biochemistry," edited by Tapas Kundu and Dipak Dasgupta.


Review

pages 2

Reviews the books "Defence and Recognition: IIA—Cellular Aspects International Review of Biochemistry," Volume 22 and "Defence and Recognition: IIB—Structural Aspects International Review of Biochemistry," Volume 23, edited by E. S. Lennox.


An Introduction to Computational Biochemistry (Book).

by Voit, Eberhard O. [2002-12-01]

Review

pages 2

Reviews the book 'An Introduction to Computational Biochemistry,' by C. Stan Tsai.


Biochemistry Collections (Book).

by Rollins, Eleanor [1982-04-01]

Review

pages unknown

Reviews the book 'Biochemistry Collections: A Cross-Disciplinary Survey of the Literature,' edited by Bernard S. Schlessinger.


From medical chemistry to biochemistry (Book Review)

by Mazumdar, Pauline M. H. [1984-08-01]

Review

pages 3

Reviews the book 'From Medical Chemistry to Biochemistry: The Making of a Biomedical Discipline,' by R.E. Kohler.


Book Corner.

No author [1980-03-01]

Academic Journal

pages 5

A list of books about science, health and medical research in the U.S. is presented including "Professional Accountability for Social Work Practice: A Search for Concepts and Guideline," edited by Helen Rehr, "Fund Raising: The Guide to Raising Money From Private Sources," by Thomas E. Broce, and "Biochemistry and Pharmacology of Ethanol," edited by Edward Majchrowics and Ernest P. Noble.


A history of biochemistry (Book).

by Underwood, E. Ashworth [1975-01-01]

Review

pages 3

Reviews the book 'A History of Biochemistry. Parts I and II,' by Marcel Florkin.


Variation of Tensile Properties of High Silicon Ductile Iron.

by Hammersberg, Peter, Hamberg, Kenneth, Borgström, Henrik, Lindkvist, Joachim, Björkegren, Lars-Erik [2018-06-15]

Academic Journal

pages 8

The casting processes are characterized by complex relationships between predictors and responses. It is the fundamental understanding of these complex relationships that often involves hundreds of factors, which improves quality without losing productivity and raising cost. In this work, cast solid solution strengthened ferritic spheroidal graphite irons GJS-500-14 and GJS-600-10 (EN 1563:2012) have been evaluated. These materials offer stronger components with good machinability owing to their even hardness properties. In this case the predictors are chemical composition, gating layout, foundry set-up, testing procedure and equipment etc. and the responses are the tensile properties (Rp0.2, Rm, A5). Here 200 tensile specimens compiled from industrial foundry melts from over 30 years of research have created a state-of-the-art platform for statistical engineering in order to perform Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) and data visualization. This statistical platform has provided new insight on how foundries should treat complex relationships between predictors and responses in order to identify sources of variation and interaction effects. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


DNA-based Nanosystems.

by Murata, Satoshi, Stojanovic, Milan N. [2008-07-01]

Academic Journal

pages 16

DNA-based nanosystems have emerged as an interdisciplinary field that draws on computer science, biochemistry, material science, and engineering. Although the field is still in its infancy, fundamental methodologies to build up large-scale complex nanosystems have been already established. In this paper, we review several recent topics in the DNA-based nanosystems, as they were presented on Kavli Japanese-American Frontier of Science meeting by Erik Winfree, Satoshi Murata, and Milan Stojanovic. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Growth Hormone Therapy and Quality of Life in Adults and Children.

by Radcliffe, Deborah J., Pliskin, Joseph S., Silvers, J.B., Cuttler, Leona [2004-05-15]

Academic Journal

pages 25

A fundamental goal of growth hormone (GH) treatment for both adults and children is improvement in quality of life (QOL). Assessments of the therapeutic role of GH depend on its effectiveness in meeting this and other goals (including improved metabolic status in adults and improved growth in children) in relation to economic parameters. However, there are difficulties in interpreting data on GH treatment and QOL. These include controversy about appropriate definitions and measures for assessing QOL, disease adaptation, comorbid conditions, and potential patient selection bias. In GH-deficient adults who have completed linear growth, there is considerable evidence that GH exerts effects on body composition, serum lipids, and bone and mineral density. Several controlled trials have also examined the effect of GH treatment on QOL in GH-deficient adults. They generally indicate improvement in QOL with GH treatment, although there are inconsistencies in the data. Caveats include differing outcome measures and instruments, instruments that are not disease specific, variation in characteristics of patient samples and treatment protocols, evidence of a placebo effect, and some inconsistency among results. Open-label trials in adults also suggest improvement in QOL with GH treatment, although interpretation is limited by potential placebo effects and patient self-selection. Studies in children have generally addressed psychological status, and relatively few specifically focus on QOL. In children with classical GH deficiency, it is intuitive that GH treatment will improve QOL, although hard data are lacking. In children with idiopathic short stature, evidence for improved QOL as a result of GH treatment is not well developed. Translating changes in QOL, together with physiological and metabolic benefits, into economic cost-benefit or cost-effectiveness analyses are needed. In doing so, it will be important to consider subgroups of patients who may derive differential benefit from GH treatment. These analyses are central to the development of a framework for research, decision making, and policy for GH treatment. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Hot crenarchaeal viruses reveal deep evolutionary connections.

by Ortmann, Alice C., Wiedenheft, Blake, Douglas, Trevor, Young, Mark [2006-07-01]

Academic Journal

pages 9

The discovery of archaeal viruses provides insights into the fundamental biochemistry and evolution of the Archaea. Recent studies have identified a wide diversity of archaeal viruses within the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park and other high-temperature environments worldwide. These viruses are often morphologically unique and code for genes with little similarity to other known genes in the biosphere, a characteristic that has complicated efforts to trace their evolutionary history. Comparative genomics combined with structural analysis indicate that spindle-shaped virus lineages might be unique to the Archaea, whereas other icosahedral viruses might share a common lineage with viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. These studies provide insights into the evolutionary history of viruses in all three domains of life. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


The Cell Hijackers.

by Brooks, Rodney [2004-06-01]

Periodical

pages 1

This article provides information on two examples of some early progress in the field of synthetic biology, as of June 2004. During the 1940s, John von Neumann, popular in the development of modern computers, investigated the theoretical possibilities of self-reproduction. Von Neumann essentially asserted that a self-reproducible machine would require a tape or other description of itself. During reproduction, this tape would serve as the set of instructions for building a copy of the machine and would itself be copied to create the seed necessary for the next generation. Apparently, DNA turned out to have precisely such properties. One of the very first computer scientists, a mathematician and engineer, made a prediction of the fundamental mechanism of life that biologists subsequently discovered. Allegedly, in a forthcoming denouement, engineering is poised for a triumphant comeback in molecular biology. The last fifty years of molecular biology have largely been devoted to understanding the incredibly complex mechanisms that govern life. Scientists have developed wonderful analytic tools to study what goes on in cells. Presently, experts are on the brink of an engineering revolution that will allegedly transform the ability to manipulate the biological world.


Academic Journal

pages 34

The writer endeavors to explain the paradox that is implicit in a characterization of “pure science” as technoscience by suggesting that the creation of the dichotomy between pure and applied science has served a purpose in legitimizing the practice of science. Historical research into the role of the division between pure and applied research is significant for the New University of the 21st century because this distinction has become institutionalized on many levels. Consequently, he finds, the “entrepreneurial university” involves an inherent tension between the normative system of the university as a “home” for pure science and the goal of catering to the market. He argues that “pure” (fundamental/basic) science is a social and economic construct that allowed university-based scientists to make demands in terms of their autonomy and funding.