Social Justice Leadership in Action: The Case of Tony Stewart*.

by Canfield-Davis, Kathy, Gardiner, Mary E., Joki, Russell A. [2008-12-01]

Academic Journal

pages 22

Reflecting on the 140th anniversary of the Fourteenth Amendment (ratified July, 1868), this qualitative case study described a response by educator-activist Tony Stewart to the Aryan Nations, a neo-Nazi hate group that attempted to intimidate Stewart's community, Coeur d' Alene, Idaho, between 1972-2000. Stewart galvanized community response using a social justice agenda. We interviewed Stewart and essential community members, and examined legal documents, articles, and documentaries. Findings indicated Stewart's leadership of public education and response via an anti-racism task force reduced and then defeated the group's viability. Educational practices included strategic planning and community outreach. The study revealed a social justice response to hate groups that educators and community leaders potentially can replicate in similar situations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Professors, managers, and human resource education.

by Langbert, Mitchell [2000-03-01]

Academic Journal

pages 10

This article critically evaluates the Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs adequately prepare human resource (HR) professionals. Globalization, technological change and corporate restructuring have underscored the strategic role played by human resource management. In order to compare HR managers' and professors' views on emerging HR issues and MBA programs' quality, 1 50 professors and 1 50 managers were contacted in 1992. Firstly, the MBA admissions process provides recruiters with a handy cognitive and motivational screening measure of MBA graduates' quality. The second might be for MBA programs' broad analytical perspective and the professors' good intentions. Clearly, HR educators are aware of and supportive of corporate goals. The third might be for MBA programs' low cost. HR professors might consider integration of competency-based instruction with more traditional courses and with internships that provide the opportunity for practice. An HR competency course might cover key competencies, such as goal and action management, functional and organizational leadership, influence management, business knowledge and HR technical knowledge.


Social Justice Leadership in Action: The Case of Tony Stewart*.

by Canfield-Davis, Kathy, Gardiner, Mary E., Joki, Russell A. [2008-12-01]

Academic Journal

pages 22

Reflecting on the 140th anniversary of the Fourteenth Amendment (ratified July, 1868), this qualitative case study described a response by educator-activist Tony Stewart to the Aryan Nations, a neo-Nazi hate group that attempted to intimidate Stewart's community, Coeur d' Alene, Idaho, between 1972-2000. Stewart galvanized community response using a social justice agenda. We interviewed Stewart and essential community members, and examined legal documents, articles, and documentaries. Findings indicated Stewart's leadership of public education and response via an anti-racism task force reduced and then defeated the group's viability. Educational practices included strategic planning and community outreach. The study revealed a social justice response to hate groups that educators and community leaders potentially can replicate in similar situations. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Principles for Organizational Change in Human Service Agencies.

by Galambos, Colleen, Dulmus, Catherine N., Wodarski, John S. [2005-01-01]

Academic Journal

pages 16

Human service agencies are facing profound changes as a result of variations in current societal political, social and environmental forces. This paper provides a review of the literature on organizational change in an effort to determine which strategies are most successful in facilitating this process and achieving desired results within agencies. Models, methods and approaches are discussed. Five principles to increase success in organizational change are proposed: (1) develop a system for continuous discussion and feedback for entities likely to be impacted by the change including those within the organization and ones at the outside constituency levels; (2) prepare the organization for change; (3) ensure that there are methods, processes and resources available to provide education and training regarding new technologies, policy changes and the change process itself'; (4) using employee participation, develop a system to recognize and reward employees for achieving targeted results and organizational goals; and (5) use the organizational change effort to build into the agency a continuous process for change. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 20

Social workers are actively engaging in the practice of interdisciplinary community collaboration (ICC) with the goal of bringing diverse groups together to improve the conditions of communities and enhance the quality of life of population groups. Yet, collaborations are challenging and require great skill and commitment. The pedagogy and the content of curricula have become a more prominent part of teaching to macro practice students and practitioners the art of effectively convening and moving collaborative efforts forward. This article adds to the literature on the content and methods of teaching students and novice practitioners the competencies embedded in ICC. It provides empirical data from six focus groups of experienced community practitioners (social workers and others) in New York City who identified components of a core curriculum for this work. Eight months later, these 33 community practitioners were asked to reprioritize the topics and concepts that they had collectively identified at the earlier time. Skills such as the ability to share power, manage differences, include the constituency and diplomacy are among those discussed. Core curriculum themes, the pedagogy and process, and the attributes and values necessary for training an ICC practitioner are presented. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 10

This essay focuses on how communities respond to curricula they see as subversive or that does not have the best intent for their community, schools, culture, or religion: responses that ensue and what informs such responses. Education in South Africa, as well as in the United States and many societies, is rooted in culture. The majority group, or the most powerful group as in the case of South Africa, usually dominates the community, schools, and society (CSS) culture. Thus, any attempt to adjust the status quo can lead to a cultural rift that threatens to tear apart the fabric of the community in question. A couple of examples from the United States are the Great Textbook War of 1974 in West Virginia, a conflict that was caused by the introduction of a new textbook to the school system; and the desegregation busing riot in Boston, Massachusetts (1974). In South Africa, the Soweto Uprising was caused by the apartheid government Medium Decree of 1974, which forced all black schools to use Afrikaans and English in a 50:50 mix as languages of instruction. Contemporary South Africa faces many challenges in relation to poverty, race, and language. What we have learned from these incidents and the future of curriculum in the digital age is the major focus of this paper. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 40

This essay delineates the respectful relationship and the historical works between W. E. B. Du Bois and Joel Augustus Rogers, and thus, it takes a look at how Du Bois and Rogers' historical and political thoughts about each other evolved and how their historical writings challenged racist Western historical thought. The essay also seeks to raise the question of what it was like to write and research Africana historical research without funds from institutions or philanthropists that did not give money towards certain type of historical works that challenged status quo Western historiography. In addition, it also raise the question what was it like to conduct Africana archival research or write Africana history in era when the British and American academy did not find viable the need to teach or research African history. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 12

Social entrepreneurship has turned into the focal recognition of scientists in the field. In the Middle East, specifically, where nations are yet developing, SE has played a critical aspect because of its driving role in advancing comprehensive development at both the full-scale and smaller-scale economy levels. This article investigates how academic achievement of social entrepreneurs and government or non-government funding increase social enterprises' performance and size leading to job creation in a pivotal nation in the Middle East, Lebanon. The study applies a multivariate linear regression to analyze variability among 39 small to medium sizes social Lebanese enterprises. Results show that academic accomplishment, training and financial support positively affect the performance of the SE and hence impact job creation. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Analysis of the Potential of Entrepreneurship Education in Young Children.

by García-Rodríguez, Fracisco J., Gutiérrez-Taño, Desiderio, Ruiz-Rosa, Inés [2019-01-01]

Academic Journal

pages 9

Studies of the impact of entrepreneurship education (EE) programmes have tended to focus on adults, in particular on university students. The present study examines the impact of an EE programme on primary school pupils from two perspectives: the effects of the programme on entrepreneurial intention (EI) and the changes in attitudes. The results show a significant increase in the EI of the participating, as well as in their perception of the feasibility of starting a business and the attitudes associated with entrepreneurship. Unlike in adults, the attitudes found to develop in children are those related mostly to self-control and achievement. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Labour Universities: physical education and the indoctrination of the working class.

by Delgado-Granados, Patricia, Ramírez-Macías, Gonzalo [2014-01-01]

Academic Journal

pages 18

This paper explores the role of physical education in Labour Universities (1955–1978) during Franco’s regime as an instrument of indoctrination and declassing of the working class. The conclusions obtained after the study and the analysis of various primary sources indicate that, initially, physical education was used as an instrument of indoctrination for the purposes of achieving the social and ideological model of Franco’s regime after the Fascist uprising (1936–1939). However, this initial orientation became less relevant in the 1960s, in favour of the inherent aspects of sport, which contributed to the declassing of the young workers. In fact, Labour Universities became national benchmarks in the area of sports within the education system. Physical education lost its indoctrinating and declassing roles after the General Law of Education was passed in 1970, and the focus shifted instead to its role as an activity for participation, education and comprehensive training. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]


Academic Journal

pages 6

This article focuses on the opportunities of physical education in the formation of professional competencies of future mid-level specialists of service sector. Through an analysis of the research and pedagogical literature and a pedagogical experiment, the author tested the effectiveness of the developed technology for the formation of professional competencies in students of services fields at vocational secondary education institutions by means of physical education. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 10

Recent significant changes, including financial threats to educational support, have affected the organisation of continuing professional development (CPD) for general practitioners (GPs) in primary care. A study was commissioned by the United Kingdom Conference of Postgraduate Education Advisors in General Practice (UKCEA) to identify the current state and value of deanery-managed CPD across the four countries of the UK. The aims of the study's qualitative component, which this paper documents, were to explore deanery educators' perceptions of CPD and to propose a generic model for CPD management. We used semi-structured telephone interviews and focus groups to collect qualitative data from deanery CPD and appraisal leads, general practice (GP) tutors, clinical governance and education leads of primary care organisations (PCOs) and national CPD policy-makers. We identified five major thematic categories in the data relating to infrastructure, function, diversity, quality and funding. We found considerable variance in deanery-managed CPD across the UK. Centralised systems of CPD management co-ordinated with appraisal were more apparent in the Celtic countries. Concerns about funding for the structures which supported CPD, and particularly the continuing role of GP tutors, were widely held in the English deaneries. It was evident that many GP tutors had been involved in managing CPD, developing an effective appraisal system and providing education based on PCO priorities. There was evidence of significant diversity and variety amongst English deaneries which may challenge the future development of an effective national revalidation scheme. We also found support across the sample for greater cohesion between deaneries, the Royal College of General Practitioners and PCOs in the management of CPD. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


A Meta-Analysis of Contemporary Quality of Educational Management Research.

by Yuan-Duen Lee, Chiu-Chuan Lin, Chen-Fen Huang [2017-05-01]

Academic Journal

pages 12

The aim of this paper is to identify the key issues in the quality of educational management research, based on co-citation and factor analyses, in order to assess the intellectual structure of this body of literature. By analyzing 58,894 citations in 1,643 articles published in SSCI journals in the field of the quality of educational management between 2004 and 2013, this paper identified the most important publications, scholars and journals. The results can help to profile the network of knowledge production in the quality of educational management research, and so provide important insights with implications for current and future research paradigms, and thus are of value to both management scholars and practitioners. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 11

Recent scientific advances in early literacy assessment have provided schools with access to critical information about students' foundational beginning reading skills. In this article, we describe how assessment of early literacy skills can help school psychologists promote beginning reading success for all children. First, we identify key skills in early literacy and describe a comprehensive assessment system, Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills (DIBELS), developed to assess essential beginning reading skills. Next, we present a conceptual framework for thinking about early literacy assessment across four distinct purposes: (a) screening, (b) diagnosis, (c) progress monitoring, and (d) student outcomes. Finally, we provide school-based examples that illustrate how DIBELS can be used to assess students' early literacy skills across each of these four purposes and facilitate informed and ongoing instructional decision making. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Psychol Schs 43: 33–43, 2006. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


CSCA EXAM PREPARATION TIPS.

by DUCHAN, BILL, WARNER, DEBBIE [2017-05-01]

Academic Journal

pages 2

The article lists preparation and study tips for the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA) Certified Supply Chain Analyst (CCSA) examination.


Academic Journal

pages 9

The author discusses the problem of human aggression as addressed in the book "Violence: A Micro-sociological Theory," by Randall Collins, a noted sociologist. How Collins's book advances the scientific understanding of violent human behavior is questioned. The principal strengths of the book include a departure from a criminological perspective of violence, a consideration of violent acts from all structural levels of human behavior, and the formulation of an original theory of violence based on sociological perspective. The book's weak points are described as an unsatisfactory distinction between violence and non-violence in individual situations, a failure to discern predatory from moralistic violence, and the notion that violence is rare because it is "difficult."


Academic Journal

pages 14

The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) universities are important bases for science and technology research and play a critical role in China’s National Innovation System. Based on the Web of Science (WoS), this article analyzes the statistics of paper published by MIIT universities and universities from across China including MIIT universities. The results are as follows: (1) Both the MIIT universities and universities nationwide in China have increased their international academic publications, and MIIT have shown a greater increase for the past decade. (2) In terms of U-I-G interaction, for UG relations, the Tug value of MIIT universities has remained stable, while that of universities in China has become declined. For UI relations, the Tui value of both MIIT universities and universities in China has shown steady growth. For UIG relations, MIIT universities have a greater synergistic effect of Triple Helix relationship than universities in China. (3) For more details in seven MIIT universities, universities elected into “Project 985”, including HIT, BUAA, BIT and NPU, have published more papers, and been more synergistic with government and industry (UIG relations) than other three universities, including NUAA, NUST and HEU. Based on the empirical results, we discuss our findings, and make certain suggestions regarding policy incentives, reasonable administrative system and U-I-G interaction mode, which is significant not only for Chinese universities but also for universities in other developing countries. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 5

Romanian legislation stimulates company management to practice a estimative management of work positions, by granting them public aid for sustaining the effort to train and adapt personnel to the complexity of work tasks. Within the present paper we have proposed to approach legal and accounting aspects regarding public aid awarded to companies for hiring students and graduates of educational institutions. For this purpose, we have analyzed legal texts which regulate the aspects of the theme of the paper and we have solved actual cases inspired by the activity of Romanian commercial companies. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Academic Journal

pages 17

Townships in South Africa are synonymous with an array of social tribulations, including poor malnutrition, low basic education levels, increased terminal illnesses, and economic stagnation. The improvement and development of townships has the potential to eradicate these unfortunate circumstances. This paper aims to ascertain the impact of the current business hive infrastructure on the economic livelihood of people in Kwa Dabeka Township. Through this study it is hoped that desired economic structures, demanded and needed by the community, are identified, with the objective of providing this community with adequate economic growth strategies. The study is exploratory in nature, and thus regarded as a foundation for further in-depth research to take place. A two-pronged research model was designed and applied, where an analysis of the community was compiled as well as an analysis of the current businesses housed in the Protex Business Hive that serves the community. Based on the results, informed recommendations are provided. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]


Is This a Drug?" Answers From Medical Students in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Eastern India.

by MANDAL, ANANYA, KUNDU, TANIA SUR, SENGUPTA, PARAMA, GHOSH, ARIJIT, DAS, NINA [2016-08-01]

Academic Journal

pages 4

Introduction: World Health Organization (WHO) defines what is drug and what is not. Second year MBBS students learn the principles of Pharmacology that they use in their later clinical practice life. The aim of the survey was to determine how medical students classify a range of preparations they might encounter in their professional lives and whether a brand name or a commercial preparation of a drug would influence their decision in the categorization of the preparation as a 'drug' or 'not a drug'. Aim: To assess the knowledge of medical students, if a substance or product is a drug. Materials and Methods: We surveyed 2 concurrent years of medical students to classify 60 candidate medicinal preparations into "drug" and "not-drug" from a validated questionnaire. The candidate preparations were named either in generic or in their commercially available forms and they were all essential drugs as per WHO definition. Results: The two groups of students, A and B, included 192 and 215 students respectively. Demographically there was little difference in the two groups. Agents like Aspirin, Paracetamol, Amphetamine, Salbutamol, Atropine, Dextromethorphan, Codeine, Diazepam, Ciprofloxacin ear drops, Levonorgestrol, Neosporin eye ointment, Furosemide, Metronidazole, Penicillin, Sorbitrate, Lignocaine, Methotrexate, Penicillin, Zolpidem and Thalidomide received almost unanimous votes as drugs. Arsenic trioxide, Fentanyl and petroleum jelly were considered to be "non-drugs" by most participants. The two groups did not differ significantly in their responses. Conclusion: Some major lacunae were noted in the knowledge of the participating students despite book teaching on the definition of a drug. Drugs used for prophylaxis and those used in physiological conditions or topically, were often missed. These gaps need to be filled by more emphasis on definition of a drug and its clinical applicability based on example and case based studies. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]