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Food Allergy.

by Knulst, A. C., Vohr, Hans-Werner [2005-01-01]

Book

pages 4

A definition of the term "food allergy" is presented. It refers to an immune-mediated disease which is caused by allergic reactions to food ingested within half an hour to two hours. Food allergy is characterized by the development of acute symptoms such as itching in the mouth and a feeling of swelling which might extend to the ears and throat. Adverse reaction to food can be classified as toxic and nontoxic reactions.


CHAPTER 6: Conclusion ON MERCY AND ITS RISKS.

by Sarat, Austin [2007-01-01]

Book

pages 20

Chapter 6 of the book "Mercy on Trial: What It Means to Stop an Execution," by Austin Sarat is presented. It points that in the state of Illinois, the issue of mercy has been put on trial in the court of law and in the court of public opinion. It concludes that George Ryan's clemency by virtue of his right to impose executive punishment has disguised the act of mercy and compassion while trying to prove that he is tough on crime.


RADIATION MONITORING.

by Lingren, Clinton L., Wels, Daniel, Bleiler, George L., Glegler, Donald P. [1999-01-18]

Book

pages 11

This article presents methods to monitor radiation levels. Radiation monitoring is concerned with measuring and monitoring ionizing radiation. Little is known about the harmful effects of ionizing radiation at levels that are typically encountered in our environment. Background radiation levels are different at different places on the earth due to elevation, the makeup of the soil, and related factors. The need for radiation monitoring in steel mills is fairly recent and is the result of 49 known incidents since 1973 where companies have inadvertently melted shielded radioactive sources, typically cobalt-60 or cesium-137.


CHAPTER 1: Introduction.

No author [2004-01-01]

Book

pages 18

Chapter 1 of the book "Neuroscience of Psychoactive Substance Use and Dependence" is presented. It explores the development of biochemical action of psychoactive substances and contribute insights on how people use them. It also discusses the uses of these substances, which include medicinal usage, illegal usage, and legal use for whatever purpose the consumer chooses.


Book

pages 46

This article presents an introduction to the book "Masculinity, Law and the Family." The book focuses on the law and the family, and the ways in which roles therein are differentiated according to gender, the conclusions have implications for legal studies generally as well as for gender studies and the sociology of masculinity. The book is, in short, not just concerned with the relationship between masculinity and law; it is about the very ideas and understandings the author has of masculinity, law and family life--and of what it is to be a man in the society. One result of the marginalizing of feminist scholarship within legal studies generally has been to negate those analyses of the gendering of law and legal method which have sought to render the law/masculinity relation problematic. There are now many texts, which argue that addressing the masculinism of law and legal practice must be central to feminist engagements with the power of law; and, most importantly, debates have now moved beyond the initial pointing out of the sexist assumptions which have underscored legislative provisions and judicial pronouncements.


INTRODUCTION: Memory, Law, and Repair.

by Rosenblum, Nancy L. [2002-01-01]

Book

pages 13

An introduction to the book "Breaking the Cycles of Hatred: Memory, Law & Repair," by Martha Minow is presented.


Chapter Three: The DSM-III Revolution.

by Young, Allan [1997-01-01]

Book

pages 29

Chapter three of the book "The Harmony of Illusions: Inventing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder," is presented. It explores adoption of DSM-III, that was part of a sweeping transformation in psychiatric knowledge-making. Further it explores that the new science of psychiatry is based on research technologies adopted from medicine (experimentation), epidemiology (biostatistics), and clinical psychology (psychometrics).


Book

pages 19

The article discusses cultural resource management in modern society. The author began assembling a collection of chapters with a working title for the volume of the journal. After some thought and discussion, in part spurred by author David Lowenthal's article "Possessed by the Past," the author backed away from using "heritage" in the title. Lowenthal's principal point in his volume is to distinguish between the real remains and well-reasoned, documented interpretations of past actions and events, which he equates with "history", and careless, popularized physical reconstructions and accounts of history, which he uses the word "heritage" to define. Lowenthal's concerns in drawing this distinction and considering it at length are with authenticity, accuracy and legitimacy. The principle, or espoused value, of authenticity drives much of the activity from the constituent parts of the contemporary "heritage industry." Museums, historic houses, national parks, archaeological excavations, townscapes, landscapes, etc. strive to present themselves or the items they contain or seek as the authentic, the "real thing."


Book

pages 6

Chapter 9 of the book "National Control Programmes: Policies and Managerial Guidelines" is presented. It explores cancer surveillance as the basis for cancer control planning, monitoring and evaluation. It highlights several statistics for assessing the burden of cancer including the measurement of incidence, mortality, and prevalence. Details about population-based cancer registry and the stepwise approach of the World Trade Organization for measuring key risk factors are offered.


Java.

No author [2003-05-01]

Book

pages 3

A definition of the term "Java" is presented. Java refers to a programming language developed by Sun Microsystems Inc. to connect intelligent devices in the home. It has generated interest bordering on religious mania in the software development community. The author inferred that Java is easier to use and more elegant than languages such as C++ and it could also be used for large-scale projects.


Perl.

No author [2003-05-01]

Book

pages unknown

A definition of the term "perl" is presented. It refers to a flexible programming language widely used in Internet environments, especially websites. Perl was written by programmer Larry Wall and is popular in programming. Its programmes will run on any platform without modifications, so the same code can be used on other hardwares.


Representative board.

No author [2003-05-01]

Book

pages 2

A definition of the term "representative board" is presented. It refers to a board whose members are the direct nominees of specific shareholders or are appointed to represent the interests of various groups of shareholders. It is frequently found in non-profit entities, where the directors are elected to serve the interests of various interest groups such as to represent patients, nursing staff and the local community.


long term care (LTC).

No author [2003-03-01]

Book

pages unknown

A definition of the term "long term care (LTC)" is presented. It refers to insurance against the costs incurred for nursing home accommodation or home help in old age. It informs that premiums vary according to the level of financing desired and are payable either annually or as a single premium.


CHAPTER 4: OVERVIEW OF DISEASE MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES.

by BERNARD, DAVID B. [2006-03-01]

Book

pages 9

Chapter 4 of the book "Advanced Therapy in Hypertension and Vascular Disease" is presented. This chapter provides an overview of disease management (DM) principles. It identifies the goals of DM programs, including to improve overall quality of life and to reduce morbidity and mortality. It also looks at the role of information systems in DM, including to identify eligible patients.


Book

pages 26

Chapter 14 of the book "Decent Working Time: New Trends, New Issues," edited by Jean-Yves Boulin, Michel Lallement, Jon C. Messenger, and François Michon, is presented. It explores the work quality, efficiency and inequalities experienced by hospital nurses and bank managerial staff in Belgium, Spain, and France. It says that occupational dynamics have been more important than social characteristics that structure the organization of work and industrial relations.


A 'Bristol sound'?

No author [2002-09-26]

Book

pages 2

The article informs that in the 1990s a body of electronic music emerged from the city of Bristol, in the West Country of England, labelled variously as trip hop, drum and bass or jungle, from artists including Massive Attack, Portishead, Roni Size and Tricky. The Bristol sound involved music that straddled a number of conventional genres, including reggae, hip hop and electronic dance music, but was characterised by minimalistic arrangements, dub-influenced low-frequency bass-lines, samples of jazz riffs, keyboard lines or movie soundtracks, and drum loops breakbeats characteristic of hip hop and rap from the ghettos of American cities during the 1970s and 1980s. Lyrics and vocal lines were often mixed at low volume in tracks, with raps often whispered and melodies resplendent with Jamaican-style ragga tunes. While place may influence musicians personal expressions, celebrations of a coherent sound remain problematic. As Portishead's Geoff Barrow has succinctly put it The Bristol scene exists mostly in people's minds (quoted in Buchanan 1998: 5). The idea of a Bristol sound was as much a social construction as a reflection of authentic local culture.


Part I: Human resource management in Asia: Chapter 8: Human resource management in Iran.

by Tayeb, Monir, Budhwar, Pawan S., Debrah, Yaw A. [2001-05-10]

Book

pages 14

The chapter focuses on major external macro factors which make up the context of Iranian organisations and discusses their implications for micro-level human resource management (HRM) policies and practices. Its literacy rate is around 72 percent, with the rate being higher in urban areas than rural regions and slightly higher among men than women. The economy, although it is a capitalist one, is run on a strict protectionist and statist model. It is estimated that the government's share of the ownership of the economy is 80 per cent. The 1979 revolution brought about changes in the relations between Iran and major western countries. As a result, there was an almost overnight halt to foreign direct investment which had hitherto provided some of the momentum for the economic growth. At the heart of Iranian culture lies its main religion, Islam, a faith to which over 98 per cent of the population belong. Whereas western and many other developed countries view HRM as a strategic function, seeking to achieve competitive advantage by making full use of human resources, in Iran the role of HRM is more basic. In addition, certain socio-political considerations might take precedence over strictly business concerns. The vast majority of Iranian organisations, notwithstanding a growing army of educated managers with master of business administration and other business degrees from home and abroad, are run by people with little or no managerial qualifications. In a protectionist economy such as Iran's, domestic firms have a captive market and are sheltered from the rigour of competition by seasoned foreign firms. As a result, there is little or no incentive for them to import successful foreign management techniques and train their workforce to implement them.


Chapter 3: Genograms with African-American Families: Considering Cultural Context.

by McCullough-Chavis, Annie, Waites, Cheryl [2007-01-01]

Book

pages 20

Chapter 3 of the book "Social Work Practice With African American Families" is presented. It provides information on an approach to completing genograms with African American families. It is inferred that genograms offer an excellent means to illustrate the family systems process and can reflect significant cultural influences. It also addresses intergenerational history, principles, values, solidarity and traditions.


Foreword.

by Bryman, Alan [1996-01-29]

Book

pages 7

The article presents the author's opinion on the philosophy of social science. In Great Britain, the Economic and Social Research Council has prescribed the Philosophy of the Social Sciences as a necessary ingredient of the postgraduate curriculum in Sociology. It is with some trepidation, therefore, that I have to confess that it is a field that I find very unappealing, though I can appreciate its potential. One reason is that as an examination of the textbooks in the field, which are now fairly numerous, would reveal, there is a curious unwillingness to ruminate about what the area is actually about. But my main bone of contention lies with the comparative lack of interest among philosophers of social science in the practice of social research. One area where philosophical issues and modern social research practice have come together is with respect to discussions about the epistemological underpinnings of quantitative and qualitative research. Researchers may legitimately choose a particular research method because of its apparent correspondence with their epistemological commitments, but that does not mean that use of the method concerned inevitably implies those epistemological commitments. An interesting twist in the possible connections between philosophy and social research can be discerned in a position, which is attracting a growing band of adherents, that suggests that there is a fundamental unity between the natural and the social sciences.


NOTES.

No author [2005-01-01]

Book

pages 20

A list of articles mentioned in the book "Effective Succession Planning" is presented, including "Guaranteeing Management's Future Through Succession Planning," by Henry Fayol, "Strategic Staffing: A Practical Toolkit for Workforce Planning," by Thomas P. Bechet, and "The Strategic Development of Talent," by William J. Rothwell and H. C. Kazanas.


Henri Fayol.

by Hindle, Tim [2008-07-01]

Book

pages 2

Part II of the book "Guide to Management Ideas and Gurus ," by Tim Hindle is presented. It discusses management ideas used by management guru Henri Fayol. It provides a short introduction to the management concepts that have most influenced companies over the past century. It focuses on various significant managerial concepts, and provides detailed descriptions on these concepts.


PROGRAM TESTING.

by Howden, William E. [1999-01-17]

Book

pages 11

The article reports that software testing refers to methods in which a piece of finished software is run on actual data. Analysis refers to methods in which software or other development products are examined for necessary or sufficient correctness. This article does not consider the more formal kinds of analytical methods, in which the goal is to prove correctness and for which a set of formal system specifications is necessary, but it includes descriptions of the less formal methods associated with and normally included in discussions of testing.


Chpater 17: Testing and debugging.

by Tennent, John, Friend, Graham [2005-07-01]

Book

pages 10

Chapter 17 of the book "Guide to Business Modelling" is presented. It explores the importance of testing and debugging business models. For a model to be relied upon with confidence, it must have credibility among those who use it. To be credible it must be technically accurate, must provide a realistic description of the environment, or the expected future environment to produce useful forecast, and it must be easy and quick to use.


Book

pages 2

A chapter from the book "China Business Laws & Regulations" is presented. It provides information on the legal systems in the People's Republic of China (PRC). It says a new constitution that stressed the rule of law was adopted by the National People's Congress (NPC) in 1982. Also noted is that the Chinese legal framework is divided into legislative, administrative and judicial categories.


Book

pages 7

Chapter 1 of the book "Law for Non-Lawyers" is presented. It explores the impact of the legal system of the U.S. on the litigation and transactions surrounding shopping centers. It also enumerates the constitutional issues that affect shopping centers that include zoning and land use, public access and tax appeals. The author claims that the right of the public to enter private property is based on the federal or state constitutionally protected rights of free speech.

Law